University of Kentucky

More information about the program can be found on the University of Kentucky website. During this 8 week long program, students engage with themes of social and environmental justice through addressing themes of global economy and its local effects, land tenure, and “clean energy” in the context of Oaxaca. During the first 5 weeks, the […]

More information about the program can be found on the University of Kentucky website.

During this 8 week long program, students engage with themes of social and environmental justice through addressing themes of global economy and its local effects, land tenure, and “clean energy” in the context of Oaxaca.

During the first 5 weeks, the students take classes, go on excursions, and meet with civil organizations, collectives, local artists, and activists. In this phase we focused on political economy, geographic issues, and an introduction to qualitative research methodology, among other themes.

In the last three weeks, the university students design and carry out an investigation with the themes that they choose. They are given the option to travel through the state, or conduct their investigation from the capital.

PART III, CARTOGRAPHY OF MINING PROJECTS

The third part of this investigation includes three foreign companies with mining projects in the Isthmus region of Tehuantepec and part of the Sierra Sur: The Canadian companies Minaurum Gold Inc and Acapulco Gold Corp and the Australian Oz Minerals. Five maps were made corresponding to the projects of these companies. This visual tool is for communities to locate themselves and know if their lands have already been granted.

Download the high resolution map

Project Santa Maria

On the website of Minaurum Gold Inc, revised in July 2018, there is a map of the Santa Marta project, which illustrates two mining concessions: the “Mar de Cobre” (Title: 231753) and “Jackita” (Title: 225472) in the Cartografía Minera de la Secretaria de Economia (SE). These two concessions cover San Miguel Chimalapa and Santo Domingo Zanatepec, totaling 7,100.3494 hectares. The original owners of the concessions have links with Minaurum. The co-founder of Minera Cascabel, Peter Megaw, is one of the directors of Minaurum. The president of the Minera Zalamera, David Jones, among other positions in the mining sector, is director and geologist at Minaurum, and the founding director of Acapulco Gold Corp, the company that manages the Riqueza Marina, Zaachila and Zapotitlán projects.

Project Aurena:

Ot the Minarium Gold Inc website, reviewed in July 2018, the company stated that the Aurena project consists of 1,035 hectares 40 km from the port of Sanina Cruz. This information coincides with the “Aurena” concession(Title:227940) in the Cartografia Minera de la SE, which covers 1,035.0912 hectares of Santo Domingo Tehuantepec. The original owner of this concession according to Cartografia Minera is Minera Zalamera, S.A de C.V. whose president is David Jones, director and geologist at Minaurum, and director and founder of Acapulco Gold Corp.

Project of Oz Minerals and Acapulco Gold in Oaxaca

The Australian company Oz Minerals, in a press release on the 19th of April 2017, details three projects of mine exploration in Oaxaca; Riqueza Marina, Zaachila and Zapotitlán. Oz Minerals says that it will be working on these projects in collaboration with the Canadian company Acapulco Gold Corp(AGC). The director and founder of AGC is David Jones, who is also president of the Minera Zalamera S.A. de C.V., the company that holds the different concessions that make up these projects. Jones also works as director and consultant geologist at Minaurum Gold Inc., the organization that manages the Aurena and Santa Marta projects in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec.

Outside of Istmo, Jones has worked consulting multiple companies including Gold Resource Corp., advising the development of Arista (Switchback) Mine of the El Águila de Valles Centrales project, and looking for new prospects for the company within the so-called ‘Oaxaca Mining Unit’.

Project Riqueza Marina, 1, 2 y 3.

The map, included in the April 19th Oz Minerals press release, indicates three polygons related to Riqueza Marina, which coincide with the location of the mining concessions “Riqueza Marina 1” (Title: 240044), “Riqueza Marina 2” (Title: 240045) and “Riqueza Marina 3” (Title: 240165) of the Cartografía Minera. The three concessions mainly cover Santo Domingo Tahuantepec, Santa María Mixtequilla, San Pedro Comitancillo, and a corner of San Blas Atempta, with a total area of 8,184.969 hectares. According to the information in CartoMinMex, on the 25th of September 2017, Oz Minerals requested a fourth concession, Riqueza Marina 4. The requested concession would cover 9,399.66 ha around the Riqueza Marina 1 and Riqueza Marina 2 concessions.

Project Zaachila

In the same April 19th press release, Oz Minerals details a second mining exploration project in Oaxaca called Zaachila. The map included in the press release indicates a polygon that coincides with the location of the mining concession “Zaachila” (Title:235917) of the Cartografía Minera. The concession covers 3,264 hectares between the municipalities of Santiago Asata and Santo Domingo Tehuantepec.

Project Zapotitlán

The third project in the 2017 press release is Zapotitlán. The map included in the press release indicates a polygon that coincides with the location of th emining concession ” Zapotitlán 1″ (Title: 238447) of the Cartografia Minera. The concession convers 5,412.9573 hectares between the municipalities of Santa Maria Ecatepec, San Carlos Yautepec, Magdalena Tequisistlán, Asunción Tlacolulita, San Miguel Tenango, San Pedro Huamelula y Santo Domingo Tehuantepec.

Ties between the principle actors

David Jones, the president and owner of Paradex Inc, recently sold the Project Rama de Ora to the Megastar Development Corp. The press release of Megastar from May 10, 2018 indicates the acquisition of the project as an agreement between the Zalamera Mine, Paradex and Megastar. The press release did not indicate which concessions the project was made up of, but in the Cartografía Minera there are three concessions with the title Minera Zalmera in the zone indicated by Megastar: “Rama de Oro” (Title: 236148; Area: 1,000 ha), “Rama de Oro 2” (Titulo: 241348; Area 3,987 ha) and “Reduccion La Zalamara” (Title 233559; Area: 3987 ha). The concessions cover San Dionisio Ocotepec, Santiago Matatlán, San Lorenzo Albarradas and San Pablo Villa de Mitla but it is unknown whether the project includes all three concessions.

On June 4th 2018, Megastar announced plans to aquire another two projects in Oaxaca, calling them Opción Magdalena and Opción Yautepec respectively. Opción Magdalena, according to the press release, consists of a 480 hectare concession. In the current Cartografía Minera there is a concession “Magdalena”(Title: 241138) which covers 480 hectares between San Pedro Quiatoni and San Carlos Yautepec.

Opción Yautepec, according to the same press release, consists of 4,861 hectares close to the project El Águila of Gold Resource Corp. In the current Cartografía Minera, there is no concession with these attributes. However, a review of CartoMinMex and its mining concession applications reveal that there is an application that was made on 25 of September for a concession called “DestinAuConocido”, which encompasses 4,860.95 hectares of San Carlos Yautepec, San Juan Lajarcia and San Bartolo Yautepec. The application has the same data as the application for “Riqueza Marina 4”.

A way to close

This investigation, in its three parts, takes 15 mining projects of foreign capital in Oaxaca, looks to the information from distinct sources to understand and map the projects and their concessions. What we are left with after this process are various maps detailing the projects of Gold Resource Corp, First Mining Gold Corp, Minaurum Gold Inc, Acapulco Gold Corp, and Oz Minerals. It fits to add that behind these large companies, operating in the state, there are actors, individuals with lots of power and influence. One of these such actors is David Jones, a principle figure that has actively participated in various mining projects in Istmo, Valles Centrales, and Sierra Sur; as well as strategic positions in diverse mining companies. It is to say, that communal lands in Oaxaca are being appropriated by a mere handful of people.

With respect to the mining companies, it is difficult to keep up with them due to name changes, and the constant transactions on concessions and projects, including requests for new concessions. Together with all the above, it should be remembered that the federal institutions in charge of the subject publish outdated and often incomplete information, which leads us to say that the mining panorama is a map always in flux, always changing. And we ask ourselves again, who benefits from this disinformation, and this confusion?

Funding CEUXhidza

CEUXhidza is a learning community located in the “El Rincón” region of the Sierra Juárez de Oaxaca, in a community called Santa María Yaviche. The community assembly of Santa María Yaviche, alongside SURCO launched this initiative with an aim to strengthen indigenous education with a proposal for better bilingual higher education for the Zapotec Xhidza […]

CEUXhidza is a learning community located in the “El Rincón” region of the Sierra Juárez de Oaxaca, in a community called Santa María Yaviche. The community assembly of Santa María Yaviche, alongside SURCO launched this initiative with an aim to strengthen indigenous education with a proposal for better bilingual higher education for the Zapotec Xhidza peoples.

One year after the start of the program, the students have responded with participation and aptitude. In September we hope to receive a second generation with the best conditions possible to cover the necessities of the students in their academic formation.

Alternative educational experiences and strategies for teachers in the face of school violence.

We congratulate the recent publication of the members of Consorcio Oaxaca “Experiencias alternativas de educación y estrategias para docentes frente a la violencia escolar” a product of a collective effort. Diverse actors contributed, including SURCO, who shared lived experiences from el Centro de Estudios Universitarios; a university project promoted and maintained by the community of […]

We congratulate the recent publication of the members of Consorcio Oaxaca “Experiencias alternativas de educación y estrategias para docentes frente a la violencia escolar” a product of a collective effort. Diverse actors contributed, including SURCO, who shared lived experiences from el Centro de Estudios Universitarios; a university project promoted and maintained by the community of Santa Maria Yaviche.

“Those of us who subscribe to this material are convinced that there is a great potential in children and adolescents to transform the situations of violence that currently exist. Not because we think that they are the future, but because we know that they are the present…In they spaces that they inhabit, particularly in school, they already face different types of violence that are a reflection of who live in their own homes, neighborhoods, cities, or communities. Understanding and dealing with these forms of violence is essential in order to more respectfully and longingly accompany the children and youth with whom we work” – Concorcio Oaxaca

We invite you to download and read the following reflections in order to nourish the educational work because we believe that the reflections and collective constructions help build knowledge. We also ask that you share with those that you know so that they can be read by more people.

Download the magazine here

Rutgers University

Para mayores informes visitar el sitio de la universidad Your Host City: Oaxaca Oaxaca, the capital city of the southern Mexican state of the same name, contains a fabulous wealth of pre-colonial heritage sites, as well as colonial and contemporary architecture. Aside from its historical treasures, the city is also known for its cobbled streets, […]

Para mayores informes visitar el sitio de la universidad

Your Host City: Oaxaca
Oaxaca, the capital city of the southern Mexican state of the same name, contains a fabulous wealth of pre-colonial heritage sites, as well as colonial and contemporary architecture. Aside from its historical treasures, the city is also known for its cobbled streets, shaded squares, colonial churches, and busy markets. The city has some outstanding restaurants, cafés, and bars, too, together with top-notch museums, art galleries, and numerous festivals. A little further afield, don’t miss the Mesoamerican architecture of Monte Alban, where some 25,000 Zapotecs (the original inhabitants of Oaxaca) once made their homes.

Values

Autonomy: We believe in the right of communities, both traditional and contemporary, to decide their own destiny. The fundamental basis of autonomy is food and water sovereignty and the free (re-)production of knowledge. Knowledge and Technologies as a commons: We embrace the idea that all knowledge — from research papers to computer programs to genetic […]

Autonomy: We believe in the right of communities, both traditional and contemporary, to decide their own destiny. The fundamental basis of autonomy is food and water sovereignty and the free (re-)production of knowledge.

Knowledge and Technologies as a commons: We embrace the idea that all knowledge — from research papers to computer programs to genetic codes — is the fruit of a collaborative process and therefore cannot be privatized or appropriated by a few. We adhere to and defend the open source concept in all spheres of life.

Participatory Politics: We are convinced of the vital importance of creating political systems based on consensual, collective models of decision-making in all spheres of life, especially in resource creation and distribution.

Respect: Human relations must be based on mutual respect for all peoples and for the natural world. Respect for diversity in all its forms and manifestations – cultural, sexual, epistemological, pedagogical, philosophical, and spiritual – is central to nurturing respect and dignity.

Vision

SURCO founders and collaborators share a commitment to social, economic and environmental justice, both within our organization and in society at large. Networking with a variety of local grassroots organizations and indigenous communities, SURCO participates actively in creating and nurturing forms of coexistence not based on the exploitation of people or the environment.

SURCO founders and collaborators share a commitment to social, economic and environmental justice, both within our organization and in society at large. Networking with a variety of local grassroots organizations and indigenous communities, SURCO participates actively in creating and nurturing forms of coexistence not based on the exploitation of people or the environment.

Where we work

SURCO’s office and classroom space is in the city of Oaxaca. We work extensively throughout different parts of the state of Oaxaca, as well as the bordering states of Chiapas and Veracruz, and in Mexico City.

SURCO’s office and classroom space is in the city of Oaxaca. We work extensively throughout different parts of the state of Oaxaca, as well as the bordering states of Chiapas and Veracruz, and in Mexico City.

Who we are

  SURCO is a non-profit grassroots organization combining consulting, academic programs and local activism. We believe that knowledge is not only meant to interpret the world, but to change it. Integrating formal education and activism allows us to provide dynamic and diverse opportunities for our program participants, while facilitating connections to the international context and […]

 

SURCO is a non-profit grassroots organization combining consulting, academic programs and local activism. We believe that knowledge is not only meant to interpret the world, but to change it. Integrating formal education and activism allows us to provide dynamic and diverse opportunities for our program participants, while facilitating connections to the international context and to collaboration with our local projects. As an active partner in a wide range of local networks that tackle social and environmental justice issues, SURCO focuses on food and water sovereignty, urban conviviality, defense of indigenous territories, and community-based radio and video.