Mexico is the only country in Latin America where the land is still in the hands of those who work it: Sebastian Pinheiro

El Consejo Agroecológico de Oaxaca, which is made up of 10 organizations and collectives from Oaxaca points out that it is an enormous commitment to invite Dr. Pinheiro, beacause it implies that they must apply what they have learned and show the results during the next visit.

Dr. Pinheiro, a permanent member of the movement “Los Sin Tierra”, of Brazil as well as the Union Internacional de Trabajadores de la Alimentación (UITA). He is a founder and member of the foundation JUQUIRA CANDIRA and various other NGOs. He visited the community of Santa María Yaviche as part of his 2019 tour “Biopoder Campesino y el Consumidor Agroecológico” where he spoke with small subsistance farmers and students of the Bachillerato Integral Comunitario(BIC) and Centro de Estudios Universitarios Xhidza(CEUXhidza), while doing agro-ecological demonstrations.

The objective of Pinheiros visit, according to Leticia Galván a member of SURCO AC, is to desiminate an agro-ecological form of production, and revalue the role and importance of campesinos; small farmers who practice agriculture mostly for subsistence. Pinheiro put much emphasis on the fact that Mexico is the only country in Latin America where the lands are still in the hands of campesinos; whereas in other countries it is held by large landowners and companies. Pinheiro enjoys visiting Mexico because he can talk to the campesinos that work the land, and can impact the way that they do their work to make it more sustainable. In this way it does not damage peoples land and health, and does not continue to increase the wealth of transnational companies through the purchase of agrochemicals.

Pinhiero came to share his agro-ecological techniques, and to help people understand that it is cheap, easy, and that it can be done with the materials on hand. In Santa Maria Yaviche he gave a training and a talked to the students from the BIC and CEUXhidza. Afterwards he held a conversation with campesinos through a dialogue open to the entire community, with the presence of community and municipal authorities.

During the demonstrations the participantes worked with different techniques and the floor was always open for people to express questions and work directly with the problems that people faced in their plots of land.

Friday the 5th and Saturday the 6th of July there will be an agro-ecology workshop in the city of Oaxaca. For this workshop organizations that work in agro-ecology and campesinos were invited. This space is also to provide continuity to the workshops that have happened on earlier tours through Mexico, with the idea that the people can express what went well for them, what failed, or what was missing.

El Consejo Agroecológico de Oaxaca, which is made up of 10 organizations and collectives from Oaxaca points out that it is an enormous commitment to invite Dr. Pinheiro, beacause it implies that they must apply what they have learned and show the results during the next visit.

Community Geographies. Community Mapping and Social Cartography: creative, pedagogical, intervention and community accompaniment processes for the social management of territories.

Community Geographies is a Book and Workbook. It is the expression of various creative social processes, pedagogical, intervention and community accompaniment, always permeated by trust. It is the result of the personal and professional experience of more than 20 years of collaboration with Popular Education initiatives, Social Movements and also in critical dialogue in academic spaces.

Download the book by clicking on the image below

Presentation (p.16)

Community Geographies is a Book and Workbook. It is the expression of various creative social processes, pedagogical, intervention and community accompaniment, always permeated by trust. It is the result of the personal and professional experience of more than 20 years of collaboration with Popular Education initiatives, Social Movements and also in critical dialogue in academic spaces. It is proposed as a way of thinking, being and doing in the midst of social diversity and for the care, defense of territories and for a dignified life. With commitment, an ethical and political attitude and with a conceptual and methodological perspective of liberation, it has the challenge of contributing to the visibility of the community and common action. In the collective construction of territorial knowledge to position the practices, looks, narratives, projects, dreams, desires and utopias of the original Peoples and Nations, in the face of the attempts to dispossess and plunder the territories. This proposal adds to the urgent call to critically articulate dialogue and the ecology of knowledge, with other thoughts, epistemology, ontology, pedagogy and narrative for life.

In the context of terror and assassination of community leaders in Mexico, today it is imperative to shout, to leave the silences, to visualize and to position the community geographies for the dignified life and the territories. For this reason, new, more creative ways of knowing, discovering and thinking about the research practice carried out from academic circles are invited, in an ethical, respectful, comprehensive and useful way to Indigenous Peoples, peasants and afrodescendants of Mexico and Abya Yala – Latin America.

It has been written with great pleasure and encouragement to share in an independent, self-managed edition, but with the selfless support of many friends committed to people and their territories. This work in dual format book-book, is the personal journey through different territories, community experiences and companionship, on the one hand recovers the conceptual reflection and on the other invites concrete practice for the recognition, care, defense and management of territories. It is aimed at promoters, facilitators, researchers and community activists; of course also for those who accompany these processes: solidarity activists and academics.

BLUE BOOK OF COMMUNITY GEOGRAPHIES

The colleague and friend David Jiménez Ramos, made available to all the book Blue, where he shares tools for participatory work.

Mapping Life

Practices, knowledge, knowledge and sciences for all.

DOWNLOAD BY CLICKING HERE

This is a travel book, to carry in your backpack and walk…

It is a self-managed edition, has been made with its own resources and based on multiple exercises of building collective knowledge, with and from different territories. It aspires to be a contribution to the care and defense of territories. It is the result of collective work with Communities, Organizations, Collectives, Nations, Peoples and Cultures of Mexico.

It does NOT pursue profit purposes, but cultural, creative and educational, so it is recommended its wide reproduction and free dissemination, as long as its content is not altered or privately commercialized or appropriated. The material presented here may be freely disseminated, although it would be highly appreciated if the source were cited.

This publication is a tool to fight against capitalism, colonialism and patriarchy in all its expressions, so we invite all readers to reproduce and distribute by any means possible, of which the most powerful is suggested: by word of mouth, in community and in the always do – learn workshops.

You are free to copy, distribute and publicly communicate the work, as well as make derivative works, under the following conditions: you must acknowledge the authorship of the work in the terms specified by the author himself. If you alter, transform or create a work from it, you can only distribute the resulting work under a license equal to this one.

Commercial reproduction of this work is only permitted to cooperatives, non-profit organizations and collectives, to self-managed workers’ organizations, and where there are no exploitative relationships. Any surplus or surplus value obtained by the exercise of the rights granted by this work must be distributed by and among the workers. Page 6

Colorado State University

In this program, Global Community Engagement in Oaxaca, Mexico, students are immersed in grassroots work of local Fair Trade activists.

For more information visit the website

Global Community Engagement in Oaxaca, Mexico

In this program, students are immersed in grassroots work of local Fair Trade activists through a 1-credit winter break faculty-led program conducted through SIT. The program includes site visits and conversations with community members focusing on economic, political and social issues. In Oaxaca, one of the leading producers of world renowned handcrafts, students take part in immersion activities with local community members to explore free and fair trade, the economic history of the city, and considerations of gender in the evolution of fair trade. Students learn through classes, site visits to NGOs, coffee producing communities, and women’s artisan cooperatives.

Colorado College

During this program, Alternative Economies, Indigeneity and Migration, students take classes, and meet with different artists, activists and organizations in Oaxaca.

Meeting

Alternative Economies, Indigeneity, and Migration

During this program students learn about alternative economies migration and indigeneity in the state of Oaxaca. During their time with SURCO A.C., they receive classes, as well as meet with different artists and activists in the city. Some of these classes and workshops have included a dialogue with Tajëëw Díaz Robles and Kiado Cruz about indigenous identity and rights and meeting with the feminist rapper Mare Advertencia Lírika about Hip Hop music and indiginous rights, gender, and social inequality. While in Oaxaca the students visit collectives and civil organizations such as EDUCA AC, CAMINOS AC, CAMPO AC, Consorcio Oaxaca AC.

Students also visit surrounding communities, like Teotitlan de Valle and Monte Albán. In the Sierra Juárez they learn about the experience of indigenous communities organizing against extractivism in Capulámpan de Méndex and Guelatao de Juárez. They also learn about community radio stations, and work with Central American migrants.

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth

Students in the Umass Dartmouth Summer Program work with local partners to compare forms of racialization as well as restorative and transformative justice in Mexico and the United States.

More information can be found on the universities website.

By looking at topics such as the War on Drugs, domestic violence, race and racism, and alternative forms of justice, students explore how justice in Mexico compares to that in their own communities. In this interactive class, students will examine the nature of contemporary justice systems as well as restorative, transformative, and indigenous justice approaches in Mexico. The comparative case of Mexico enables students to see very different understandings of crime and justice, even as they will trace how the U.S. – and New England – are intimately connected to Latin America and the Caribbean. The 2019 trip will also include an extended discussion about ethnicity and racism in Mexico, including with local Afro-Mexican organizations.

University of Ottawa

As in all countries in the world, some Mexican populations suffer exclusion and discrimination from the dominant groups in Mexican society. Many social groups, such as women ethnic and linguistic minorities, migrants and refugees. These minority groups in Mexico are subject to various forms of injustice(legal, social and economic).

More information can be found in the Unversity of Ottawa website

Focusing in the themes of social justice, this course looks to understand the socioeconomic inequalities and the sociocultural conflicts in Mexico that make certain social groups more excluded and discriminated socially, economically, legally and institutionally. We study the sociological, historic, economic and political factors inherent to the process of exclusion and discrimination. Throughout this course we analyze the various facets of the process of marginalization(prejudice, exclusion, discrimination, racism and institutional racism). Special attention will be given to the struggles, challenges and opportunities of these minority groups and how they have organized themselves to fight for their rights.

Border Studies Program

Potential excursions take Border Studies students to a number of sites that include trips to the Sonoran-Arizona borderlands along both sides of the border as well as the interior of Mexico.

For more information visit the program website

Border Studies is a semester long program based out of Tucson Arizona, that runs in both the spring and fall. It includes a class component, field study with a local organization, and excursions. Potential excursions take Border Studies students to a number of sites that include trips to the Sonoran-Arizona borderlands along both sides of the border as well as the interior of Mexico. Past excursions have included Nogales, Sonora, Mexico; the O’odham Nation in Sonora; the Río Sonora Valley; El Paso and Ciudad Juárez; Oaxaca and Chiapas, Mexico; New Mexico’s Gila Wilderness; as well as sites in Arizona like Florence and Arivaca. The unique combination of coursework, field studies, and travel seminars create an outstanding opportunity for students to deepen their understanding of their own positionalities in relationship to space, a multitude of communities and their particular struggles for social justice. Excursions also allow for students to explore several academic themes such as migration, the global economy, environmental degradation, development, sustainability, transnational communities, international boundaries, and justice in a land marked by numerous inequalities. Please direct questions about international travel to Patty Lamson at borders@earlham.edu

CEUXHIDZA

CEUXHIDZA beyond just an institution is an experience in which the students are part of a new model of learning that permits them to reassess principles, techniques, knowledge and community values.

Visit the website for more information

The Center for University Studies, CEUXHIDZA is a learning community inspired by intercultural dialogue and knowledge. We consider that wisdom is not used just to interpret the world, but to change it. We wish to share an educative process of constant investigation and learning where the pedagogy is inspired by our own life experience, cosmovision, interrelationships with other beings, and from the Xhidza(Zapoteco) people. Our motto; “perceive and create the echos of the world” is derived from the fact that to reinforce our mode of living, we need to perceive the echos of the world living in community(Yedzi). Through affection we can create to become that we believe possible.

 

University of Kentucky

During this 8 week long program students study social and environmental justice in Oaxaca.

More information about the program can be found on the University of Kentucky website.

During this 8 week long program, students engage with themes of social and environmental justice through addressing themes of global economy and its local effects, land tenure, and “clean energy” in the context of Oaxaca.

During the first 5 weeks, the students take classes, go on excursions, and meet with civil organizations, collectives, local artists, and activists. In this phase we focused on political economy, geographic issues, and an introduction to qualitative research methodology, among other themes.

In the last three weeks, the university students design and carry out an investigation with the themes that they choose. They are given the option to travel through the state, or conduct their investigation from the capital.